There has been a prejudice that if you want to successful you have to be outspoken, blunt and audacious. The 20th century made way for this very concept to reach the metamorphosis of a prerequisite for success. Urbanization, corporation and modern enlightenment have played their vital part in the process. However, if taken a glance at the history of human beings and evolution of civilization since the pre-historic days, the world has seen great leaders, who were soft spoken intellects and weighed their words while speaking and more importantly while writing.

Even in the contemporary world, there are leaders, thinkers and mentors who are men of who words. They think before they leap and that is evident from their writings and speeches. Although the current scenario favours the corporate world and big money makes faster brains but there are people who are more or less the quiet type and listen more than they speak, Bill Gates of Microsoft and Larry Page of Google are some of the examples to quote.

Mahatma Gandhi reshaped the politics of revolution in the mid-1900s when he freed his nation from the tyrant clutches of the English Empire. However, this does not mean that out-spoken work on hit and trial basis.

Despite the corporate world’s insistence on brazen confidence–Speak up! Promote yourself! Network!—one third to half of Americans are believed to be introverts, according to Susan Cain, author of just released Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. She contends that personality shapes our lives as profoundly as gender and race, and where you fall on the introvert-extrovert spectrum is the single most important aspect of your personality.

Introverts may make up nearly half the population, but Cain says they are second-class citizens.

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