The reality of the situation is that at least US-based customers do not want electric and hybrid cars, but instead they are looking for fuel efficiency combined with power. During 2011, almost 97.9 percent public purchased vehicles with internal combustion engines. However, they are certainly looking for fuel-efficient cars.

The data collected since the start of 21st century shows a clear shift in the aforesaid trend. During 2000, Ford sold around 300,000 units if its truck, Ford Explorer. With these sales, the company reined the US market for almost half a decade. However, during 2010 and 2011, Ford Escape has become the heartthrob of US public. Last year, Ford sold 254,000 units of Escape, which is a crossover. Escape has a combined mileage of 20 miles-per-gallon as opposed to Explorer’s 16, which is a 25 percent increase in efficiency.

The automotive companies are also keen in bringing perfection to gas-engine. They are in continuous research and development for engines that consume less fuel and provide more or same power. On the other hand, electric vehicles get the least attention from these companies.

The modern trend in the US is to go for car-based trucks and SUVs instead of large and gasoline-hungry trucks or truck-based vehicles. Accompanying crossovers are hatchbacks and mini and micro cars.

Generation Y is on the verge of flexing its buying muscle and the trend they see and like is sedans, hatchbacks and crossovers. However, electric cars do not even come near them. In addition to being underpowered, electrics have expensive price tags that ward off potential users, who happen to be environment friendly.

By 2025, there might be electric and hybrid cars in the market but there is not guarantee that the same market will have customers. CARB should have considered the trends and economic cycles before mandating the new regulation.

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