However, both of them were of little words responding to Microsoft’s latest stunt. While HP isn’t commenting on Surface “we will have a full range of Windows 8 machines,” HP spokesperson Marlene Shostack told the media.

Dell had little to say as well. “Microsoft is an important partner to Dell and we look forward to delivering a full slate of Windows 8 products – including tablets – later this year,” according to a statement by Matthew Hutchison, Dell’s director of global product PR.

On the whole both of the companies will keep their current strategies intact with the coming of new ultrabooks, fauxtrabooks, tablets and tablet-ultrabook hybrids. However, should the new Surface RT and Pro become a success in the consumer market, it will become hard for both of them work hand-in-hand with Microsoft.

Both HP and Dell have undertaken different strategies in the past. HP bought Palm, mobile operating system developer, and its signature software WebOS in 2010 for $1.2 Billion. However, its smartphones and tablets met the ground with a loud thud. The unsuccessful ventures forced HP to scrap Palm OS and all its products to the open source market.

Dell did something akin to HP in the recent years as well. While best known as a vendor of Windows machines, it has long sold servers running Red Hat and SUSE Linux, and sells personal computers equipped with Ubuntu Linux.

It initiated a new marketing strategy this year by announcing Ubuntu Linux as a part of the new Dell XPS 13. The ultrabook currently holds Windows as its operating system, but the inclusion of Ubuntu or the complete replacement might be a reply to Microsoft’s new tablets.

In other news Google is planning to launch its own branded tablet with Android operating system. If the June 18 conference was a trailer to what complicated relationship is forthcoming between software developers and hardware vendors, the Google tablet launch will be a featured motion picture.

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