Moreover, there e-reader applications from LG in addition to some games, though most of them are Korean-versions.

Included inside the chassis is a GSM radio, FM/AM radio and a television transmitter. In addition to these old and standard organs, LG also provides an NFC chip with two gold antennae. Though Android Beam is an ICS-exclusive app, LG’s own applications work the trick on the phone.

The company also provides three Tag+ NFC cards with three  modes that are executable at the disposal of a single tap on the phone. These cards, Car, Sleep and Office, kick in three different modes with adjustable screen brightness, ringtone volume, vibrator, alarm and reminders.

The NFC was however, less sensitive to cards and other functions when compared to Optimus 3D Max but it adjusts its sensitivity after a couple of interactions with the device.

The primary camera can record up to 1080p video while retaining the good quality in frames per second and jitters and jostles. However, due to the 4:3 screen ratio, there are dead black bars on the top and bottom of the phone to adjust the video resolution.

The front-facing camera records 720p video that has less option than rear camera but the picture quality in both still photographs and movie clip was better than other secondary snappers.

The screen has a 1,024×768-pixel resolution that is clocked at 4:3 screen ratio, which the company says is best for web browsing and watching television shows. However, all the apps adjust intelligently to the pixel ratio on the screen. If it does not, pressing and holding the home button does the job.

Final Take

Though it has a simple and sleek design that goes back to renaissance age, the Vu is a big phone that stands out in the crowd, both of phones and actual people. However, despite its bigger screen real estate, it still is expensive at $900, for the globally unlocked phone. Moreover, that is a lot to ask for a phone that still runs Gingerbread instead of ICS.

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY