As do Google and Twitter, Microsoft has begun publishing called "transparency reports" which, in reality, does not mean they do business with their cookies or
customer data, but what different government agencies ask about customer data.

The report states that they have received 75,000 applications for police from different countries to meet user data from Microsoft and mentioned names such as U.S., UK, Turkey, Germany and France as the most frequent requesters.

The United States topped the list of agencies interested in knowing who created specific images or other content. Most other applications have to do with the content of data such as user names, addresses, and
other low-level identifiers.

In most cases, Microsoft only provides basic information such as user names and IP addresses. Applications involving more than 137,000 accounts in various Microsoft services such as Hotmail, Outlook, Xbox Live
or Skype.

According to reports Microsoft’s general counsel, Brad Smith, is very difficult to estimate how many individual users have been affected, because many people have several separate accounts.

Among the data provided by the company finally, only 2.1% has to do with the content created by people. This includes documents or images stored on servers or emailed, and copies of messages sent through its
services. Over 99% of applications for content data came from U.S. agencies responsible for enforcing the law.

In 18% of applications demand, Microsoft does not provide any data, either because they had or were not properly presented. It is estimated that only 0.02% of Microsoft users have been involved in requests for
police data. Microsoft will update the report every six months.

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