The 9/11 attacks that resulted into the so-called U.S.-led war on terror have brought miseries and huge economic losses to Pakistan. Bomb attacks have killed thousands, mostly civilians, across Pakistan since Pakistan has become part of the US coalition.

Casualties in Pakistan are more than the U.S. and any other country. The sacrifices of Pakistanis made the U.S. safe however Pakistanis still suffer because of U.S. policies and interference in our affairs by the American leaders.  

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif pointed out this week that over 40, 000 people, including children and women, have lost lives and the country suffered billions of dollars losses.

A report presented in the Supreme Court of Pakistan by the security agencies few months ago had put the death toll in attacks nearly 50, 000.

Pakistani leaders say the country suffered around 70 billion dollars since Pakistan has joined the US-led coalition, the amount is more than what Washington has given to Islamabad in the same period.

Terror attacks gripped Pakistan when the security forces launched operation in South Waziristan tribal region for the first time in 2003, two years after the US invasion of Afghanistan.

Interior Minister, Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan, admitted on Tuesday that former military president Pervez Musharraf had sent troops to the tribal regions on foreign pressure.

That decision was the beginning of deaths and destruction in Pakistan and the country is facing the war and its consequences. There is no let up in attacks and however a recent decision by a government-sponsored conference of political parries to hold talks with the militants has raised hopes for peace.

Many in Pakistan believe that attacks on the New York Twin Towers and Pentagon on September 11, 2001 have brought more suffering to Pakistanis.

Pervez Musharraf’s decision to join the U.S.-led coalition, proved to be disastrous for Pakistan as Taliban militants unleashed an all-out war on the security forces, political leaders, tribal elders and the communities which they thought are supporting the army.

Taliban militants, who routinely claim responsibility for attacks, say they are showing angry reaction to the military operations and to the US drone strikes.

All surveys conducted in Pakistan suggested that majority in Pakistan consider the U.S. as the biggest enemy of Pakistan, a clear indication that Pakistanis do not trust the United States.

When Musharraf joined the U.S.-led ally, he had told the nation in a televised address that his decision would secure Pakistan, improve its economy and protect the country’s nuclear program. But all his claims proved to be false.

No other country suffered as much as Pakistan as the result of the 9/11 attacks and even  now the whole nation feels itself insecurity in view of bomb attacks in marketplaces, mosques, Imambargahs, funerals, playgrounds and educational institutions. Civilians become the main target of such brutal attacks as the perpetrators do not have respect for human lives.

Foreign investors are shy to invest in Pakistan and even some own businessmen have shifted business to other countries. No Western airlines come to Pakistan over security concerns.

Policies of the new government have raised hopes for peace to end the bloodshed as the leadership has hinted not to accept any U.S. pressure on affairs. The government is now planning talks with the Taliban as it has also won support from political parties and the security establishment.

The government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif is under pressure to quit the U.S. war as this policy has dragged Pakistan into a quagmire. Pakistan must secure its tribal regions bordering Afghanistan ahead of the NATO withdrawal to avoid any instability in case of civil war in the neighbouring country.

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY