The first time I called the paper hardly heard what counted. It sounded far, far away, no doubt. Camille Lepage, French, 26, was given an International section number and one passerby broke the phone in hand. The photojournalist, born in Angers, was in Juba, capital of South Sudan, newborn African country. March 2013 and ran as she could and told through a terrible history communication, taking root in the country beyond that achieved independence in 2011 did not matter to the other side of the world. Now, a little more, but then it was difficult to spot a page with an account of what happened in the new frontier of Africa.

Or what happened in South Kordofan province of Sudan, ruled by Khartoum, situated in the hills of Nuba. That ‘s what he had traveled in 2012 Lepage, to relate the continuous bombing Khartoum was undergoing that province, rich in oil and rebel against the territorial domain of the North, who still owns. With passion, Lepage sold, as they say in the profession, the work he had done, the pictures I had shot, still housed in its web and outstanding quality. ” The Silent War ” Lepage called what he had seen.

Last July, five months before the violence broke out in South Sudan, starting among the faithful to President Salva Kiir and Riek Machar supporters of former vice president, immortalized Lepage, this time in black and white, the wounds left by the ethnic conflict in Jonglei State, one of the hardest hit by the conflict. Her story dominating confrontation between South Sudanese Nuer ethnic group in the country second, linked to Machar, and members of the Murle community. Lepage expressed concern about the fate of the Murle wounded, of which he knew nothing.

French President François Hollande, reported Tuesday ‘s death in Bouar Lepage, in this stretch of the Central African Republic, South Sudan’s neighboring country. According to Hollande the photojournalist has been found by members of the French –  military contingent of some 2,000 – inside a vehicle stopped at a checkpoint. The car was occupied by antibalaka, Christian militiamen fighting the rebels Seleka of Muslim origin, who staged the coup of March 2013.

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