Emissions of greenhouse gases are increasing globally at a rate that will cause significant changes in the average temperature of the planet in the coming decades, with a significant impact on the lives of people. Given the global nature of the problem, only global measures could fix it; or at least to alleviate it. Experience has shown that these agreements are difficult to implement and many countries, some of them highly polluting, refuse to sign them for reasons of national economic interest. However, there are some data that indicate a change.

On the one hand, Europe has exceeded its reduction commitments made at the Kyoto Summit 1997. Cutting emissions compared to 1990 is already more than 11% (the commitment was 8%). The trouble is that Europe today represents a small part of the global – emissions by 13%. In this role, secondary force, we must add that the EU has lost in recent summits on climate authority and leadership that used to have.

Moreover, the United States, which along with China is responsible for half of all air pollutants emissions, has changed its traditional opposition to such restrictions and announced an ambitious reduction program. Specifically, 30% for 2030 compared to emissions in 2005. Chances are that this objective does not involve a lot of effort into promoting renewable sources, but is achievable replacing coal-fired electricity power plants by natural gas. This simple change is doing to improve the level of emissions in the U.S., but has not been produced for environmental reasons, but for the emergence of shale gas, which has significantly increased production at reduced prices and is precipitating a complete renovation in the energy sources of American industry.

Beyond news, the outlook for global emissions remains a concern. Only an agreement accepted by the major producers of greenhouse gases, including the U.S., China, India, Australia, Canada, Japan and Russia, along with Europe and other countries, the trend may change significantly and lastingly.

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