The German government disavowed minister on Friday blamed Qatar Islamic State funding (EI). But the slip holder Development, Gerd Müller, has brought to light a suspicion that is often repeated in Iraq. Even the Prime Minister in office now, Nuri al-Maliki, said the rich Emirate and Saudi Arabia as blame for the current situation. What this serious allegation is founded?

Of course, the two countries, both allies of the United States -who depend for his defense, rejected the allegations. However, there are some elements that allow their enemies to establish connections that, while embarrassing, do not prove causality looking.

Both Qatar and Saudi Arabia follow Wahhabi doctrine, an interpretation of Sunni Islam which many analysts find the doctrinal basis of religious radicalism sweeping the Islamic world. Although not all pious Wahhabi support the use of violence, violent Islamist groups all have drunk of Salafi sources.

That ideology was extremely useful to the United States in the eighties of the last century when he justified the call to stop the cheating and communist Soviet Union in Afghanistan. For the Saudis and other Muslims delivered responders were called Mujahideen, literally ” those who wage jihad,” religious term loosely translated as holy war. They were the seeds of Al Qaeda.

Something similar would be happening now. When it became clear that the United States (and by extension the West) had no intention of intervening in Syria to stop the brutal repression that Bashar al-Assad quelled the initial peaceful protests, Riyadh and Doha especially enthusiastic with Arabs springs facilitated financing and jumble of arms to groups trying to form the Free Syrian Army, with the more or less tacit approval of Washington.

Nobody knows where everything ended up. In the heat of battle, the positions were radicalized and different groups began to compete for the help. Syria became an appetizing piece for Al Qaeda, and a magnet for extremist Muslims in a hurry to get to heaven, or mere idealists eager to help the Syrian brothers. In the press began to call them jihadists; brigades have been more appropriate, but ultimately have proved mere terrorists.

As documented Rania Abouzeid in The Jihad Next Door, the leaders of Al Qaeda initially commissioned its Iraqi affiliate, the Islamic State in Iraq (ISI), to form a similar group in Syria. This is how Al Nusra whose success ultimately led to a split in the jihadist front emerged. When the center of Al Qaeda leader asked the ISI, Abubaker al Baghdadi, who left to focus on Syria and Iraq, he responded by creating, in April 2013, the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (EIIL now Islamic State) and adopted an even tougher than their mentors online.

Meanwhile, the group expanded its business of extortion control of oil fields in Syria and, last June, with the deposits of the vault of the Bank of Iraq in Mosul. Today, after several pencils accidentally intercept memory with the group accounts, assets are estimated at 2,000 million dollars.

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