The World Health Organization (WHO) has selected a list of eight experimental treatments and develop two vaccines against Ebola. Therapies not be available until late 2014, has warned the organization in a working paper published Thursday citing Agence France Presse. 200 experts are meeting in Geneva in order to plan measures to combat the virus.

” None has been clinically proven ” says about these treatments WHO, indicating that, despite the extraordinary measures put in place to accelerate until the end of the year ” only small amounts of up to a few doses and treatments are available.” The organization notes that the development of these treatments is lengthened under normal circumstances 10 years.

In the USA, the company NewLink Genetics ensures that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has allowed it to begin testing on humans an experimental vaccine against Ebola, Reuters reports.

The current outbreak of Ebola virus in West Africa is unprecedented in its scale and complexity and the burden on health systems. Experts from various countries are meeting this Thursday and for two days in Geneva to make a joint assessment of medical options to address Ebola.

This includes medicines and vaccines that are investigated but had not passed clinical trials humanos.La meeting has been convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop a plan for evaluation and use of different therapeutic possibilities against a highly lethal and contagious disease with no known cure.

Participants are technical experts, representatives of pharmaceutical products being developed against Ebola, as well as representatives of the governments of the countries affected by the current outbreak in West Africa.

The Ebola outbreak began last March and since then has spread from Guinea Conakry, where the first case was identified, to Liberia and Sierra Leone, which are the countries where the spread is more -less alarmante.Un limited number of cases twenty- have been identified in Nigeria and one in Senegal.

According to the latest WHO statistics, reported six days ago, the number of deaths from this outbreak rises to 1,552, a total of 3,069 cases. A second outbreak, distinct and independent of the first, now takes place in Democratic Republic of Congo, where fifty confirmed infected and 31 deaths.

Among the experts who have come to Geneva are also representatives of patients and medical ethicists, who will give their views on how to decide who gets priority for experimental therapies.

An important strand argues that the first beneficiaries should be HCWs who are infected, as they risk their lives for patients. According to the WHO, about 220 medical staff were infected with Ebola in West Africa and 130 of them have died.

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