When students submit their applications containing important and confidential information, they believe in the protection of that information. However, when a 20-year-old female applicant, Rabia Aziz, got a message from an anonymous sender, sharing all her details with her, she became very nervous.

Aziz later found out that the applications forms she had submitted to Dow University of Health and Sciences (Dow), had been leaked and the papers were actually sold to paan vendors in which they sold their paans.

While talking to a private news channel, Aziz said that the test for Dow university had been administered on November 4, 2017. “A friend of mine suffered a similar fate. She saw my Facebook post and messaged me saying she had received phone calls about how her documents could be misused,” she added.

On March 1, a paan vendor by the name of Amjad Ali whatsapped Aziz and told her that he had gotten her university application forms, along with her passport size photo, through a raddi wala.

Ali also sent her shots of other Dow application forms and pictures of four other women. Unable to comprehend what had happened and how it transpired, Aziz took to social media to raise the issue. Her post has been shared thousands of times and the university has taken notice of the issue.

“An investigation is underway. We also learnt about the incident from social media,” Dow Vice-Chancellor Saeed Qureshi told a local news channel. He further added, “There are two ways an incident like this could have taken place. Either it’s someone from DOW trying to sabotage the image of the institute and scaring aspiring students. Or the forms were not properly discarded.”

Applications are disposed off a year after their receipt, the VC informed. “Forms received in 2015 were recently burnt. Those received in 2016 are yet to be consigned to flames. It is beyond me how 2017 documents have been leaked,” he added.

“I urge everyone affected to approach the varsity. We are conducting an investigation,” Qureshi said. The VC expressed hope that the case would be cracked soon as it was compromising the university’s standing.

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