Four of the girls abducted last month by the Nigerian militia Boko Haram in northeastern Nigeria have escaped from their captors, who still have retained 219 other teenagers, according to the head of the Borno State Education, Inuwa Musa, reported Reuters.

Girls were in a high school in the village of Chibok when an armed group attacked the center. Militants surrounded the school and kidnapped the girls.

After the kidnapping, 53 hostages escaped, which would add to the four confirmed Inuwa now.

The terrorist group made public last May 12  a video for the first time, showed images of the hostages reciting a sura in the Quran and its leader, Abubakar Shekau, argued that young girls will be released by an exchange of prisoners.

The video, which lasts 17 minutes, showing a hundred young girls sitting on the floor and wearing the full Muslim veil at an unknown location after that under Shekau own, have been converted to Islam. Most of the girls are Christians. Subsequently, three of them have their say, two of which claim to have converted to Islam, while the third is Muslim. One of them explains that they have not suffered any type of abuse. During his speech, the leader of Boko Haram, which appears sitting, smiling and holding a Kalashnikov, is expressed in Arabic and Hausa saying that girls will be released in exchange for their prisoners.

United States has sent about fifty soldiers to Chad, an ally of Washington in Africa, to help locate and rescue the students. The U.S. president, Barack Obama, reported Wednesday that these troops “will support the operation of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance” in northern Nigeria, where supposedly there are girls.

The eighty soldiers who participate in the search for the kidnapped are added to the thirty experts that the Obama Administration sent a few days ago to support the Nigerian government in the rescue effort.

Obama’s announcement last May 22 came two weeks after the kidnapping of a Nigerian students skip school to mobilize world public opinion and from social networks to the U.S. president and first lady, Michelle Obama. “Perhaps this is the event that finally mobilize the international community to do something about this horrible organization that has perpetrated this horrible crime,” Obama said on May 6, in a television interview.

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