The emerging energy nexus of China with the Central Asian States is now termed the New Great Game. 

China has its eyes set on Central Asia, thus prompting a New Great Game in a region where Europe, Russia and the US have sought power for a long time.

Since the turn of the new millennium, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has become one of the fastest growing economies in the world.

Naturally, a country of China’s aspirations and size needs to have bundles of energy resources to stay on the path of progress.

Central Asia as China’s personal trading zone

China has traditionally viewed Central Asia as its personal trading area and a region heavily influenced by Chinese culture. Many of history’s most impressive trading centers were positioned in Xinjiang or west of China’s current borders, such as Jarkand,
Samarkand, Urumuqi and Kokand. The trade between China and Central Asia has always been crucial and favored by both sides, as it is today. The only change today is that the traders have replaced jade, tea and silk with natural resources, weapons and infrastructure.

The domestic oil resources for China are primarily based in the North and Northwest regions of China, the most important region being Xinjiang, but those sources are close to depletion according to many sources.

China’s need for oil and gas is growing as is most states’ need for it in order to maintain their economic development.

In recent times, Chinese relations with Central Asian States (CAS), have strengthened as the most tenanted nation on Earth aims to address its ever-growing need for energy and hydrocarbons, something, these landlocked states have in abundance.

China has always supported the independence and sovereignty of these states by both political and economic means.

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